Armenia – Belpre Township
Post Office: 1887 – 1915
Location: 39.230602, -81.707785
on Newbury Rd (State Rte 124) at the intersection of Township Rd 299
Remnants: Newberry (Newbury Community) Cemetery south of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of Newbury Rd (State Rte 124) & T502
Description: Charles Wesley Oakes (1846 – 1925) was a Feemason & the town’s postmaster. He married Lucy (Sedgwick) Oakes (1849 – 1929) & had 5 children. His grandparents, Joel Oakes (1766 – 1822) & Susannah (Bent) Oakes (1771 – 1865), were from Worcester County, Massachusetts. They married in 1795, had 7 children & were early pioneers in the county. Susannah’s father was a Revolutionary War veteran & participated in the Boston Tea Party. Charles was buried with his family & other residents in Newbury Community Cemetery.

Aurelius – Aurelius Township
Post Office: 1851 – 1860
Location: 39.591276, -81.419388
on Brooms Run between SR 821 & T614 along Duck Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: Civil War veteran & Township Trustee Archibald Grubb (1833 – 1895) built a grist & saw mill next to Duck Creek & was the town’s postmaster. Aurelius also had a school on the opposite side of the creek on the south side of SR 821 just east of the intersection of Brooms Run. Archibald was buried in Waterford Cemetery on Sunset Ln in Waterford Township.

Barber – Warren Township
Post Office: 1852 – 1859
Location: 39.434494, -81.538553
on Christy Rd between Warren Chapel Rd & Olinn Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: This small farming & postal town had a school on the east side of T125 a mile south of the GPS coordinates. Jesse Johnson was the postmaster.

Barnett Ridge – Barlow Township
Location: 39.361668, -81.624584
on Barnett Ridge Rd (C2) between Veto Rd (C3) & Rocky Point Rd (Co Rd 27)
Remnants: Barnett Ridge & Cemetery at the GPS coordinates, another church on the east side of Barnett Ridge Rd about 1/2 mile north of the GPS coordinates
Description: Barnett Ridge had a couple of general stores & a few schools from the mid-1800s to mid-1900s. Over 60 Barnett family members have been laid to rest in the cemetery, with the most recent being Ruth (Barnett) Mayle (1918 – 2017). Ruth attended & later taught at the last school the town had. She was also a member of the Belpre Historical Society.  

Big Bottom
Post Office: 1834 – 1838
Location: unknown
Description: Jesse Blackmer (1809 – 1889) & John Shrader were the postmasters. The office moved to Stockport in Morgan County. Jesse was buried with relatives in Blackmer Cemetery on the west side of SR 266 about 1/3 of a mile south of Mill Run in Windsor Township, Morgan County. 

Carter – Ludlow Township
Post Office: 1899 – 1904
Location: 39.561191, -81.241743
on Township Rd 64 along Wingett Run between Township Rd 364 & Community Club Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: The town had a saw mill & a Christian church on the west side of Township Rd 64 on land owned by John Adams. A school was northeast of the GPS coordinates on the west side of Township Rd 88. William Adams was the postmaster.

Cats Creek Mills – Adams Township
Post Office: 1813 – 1817
Location: unknown
Description: It was along Cat Creek north of Upper Lowell & had a mill owned by Wheelock, Fuller, & Salder. Daniel W. Wheelock (1785 – 1853) from Massachusetts was the postmaster. He moved to Dayton & was buried with relatives in Woodland Cemetery And Arboretum on Woodland Ave in Dayton, Montgomery County.

Dye – Fearing Township
Post Office: 1883 – 1902
Location: 39.504980, -81.394913
on Whipple Run Rd at the intersection of Township Rd 329
Remnants: Berg Church & Cemetery about 1/3 of a mile southwest of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of Township Rd 329 & T332, old houses & farm buildings in the area
Description: Dye was a small farming & postal town with a school in the southwest lot of the intersection. A. M. Templeton was the first postmaster. He was succeeded by Thomas Strickling (1857 – 1936) who later moved & was buried in Fairview (Long) Cemetery on Fairview Rd in Springfield Township, Gallia County. G. F. McVay was the last postmaster. Berg Church was constructed in 1872 on land owned by German immigrants Peter Berg (1814 – 1899) & Margaretha (Moerschel) Berg (1818 – 1884). They married in Germany in 1837, moved to the U.S. in 1841, & had 11 children. Peter & Margaretha were laid to rest in the cemetery with relatives & other residents of Dye.

Gray – Liberty Township
Post Office: 1873 – 1889
Location: 39.549062, -81.332634
on Dalzell Rd (Co Rd 11) at the intersection of T606
Remnants: Waxler Church & Cemetery 1 mile southwest of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of Dalzell Rd & Stanleyville Rd (C42)
Description: It was named after the Gray family in the area & had a general store in the corner on the east side of the GPS coordinates owned by Wilford Howell (1821 – 1891) from Monroe County & Agnes (Farnsworth) Howell (1825 – 1894) from Pennsylvania. There was another store on the Howell farm next to their residence on the south side of Dalzell Rd about 1/4 mile southeast of the GPS coordinates. The town’s first school was also on the Howell farm. Its second school was east of Waxler Church at the intersection of Stanleyville Rd & Whipple Run Rd. Wilford & Agnes were buried with relatives in Dalzell Church Cemetery about 2 & 1/2 miles northeast of town on the north side of Dalzell Rd.

Henrys Crossing – Barlow Township
Location: 39.386946, -81.627024
on Stone Quarry Rd at the former railorad crossing between SR 550 & Rocky Point Rd (Co Rd 27)
Remnants: none known
Description: The original proprietors were Nathan Proctor Henry (1821 – 1875) from Ohio & Caroline Geneva (Ward) Henry (1827 – 1903) from Massachusetts. They got married in 1852, had a few children, & owned a 200 acre farm. They town was along the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad (later bought by the B & O). Nathan was buried with relatives in Barlow Central Cemetery 2 miles northwest of the GPS coordinates on the north side of SR 550. We were unable to locate Caroline’s grave. 

Hope – Decatur Township, Washington County & Rome Township, Athens County
Post Office: 1894 – 1899
Location: 39.298131, -81.814401
on Federal Rd at the 4-way intersection of Lincoln Hill Rd & Welch Rd (Co Rd 111)
Remnants: none known
Description: Hope had a blacksmith shop in the lot in the northwest corner of the intersection on land owned by William F. Johnson. Civil War veteran Truman E. Place (1849 – 1923) was the postmaster. He later moved & was laid to rest in Ohio Soldiers And Sailors Home Cemetery on Columbus Ave in Sandusky, Erie County. 

Liberty Hill – Aurelius Township
Post Office: 1855 – 1865
Location: 39.592766, -81.468169
on Highland Ridge Rd (Co Rd 8) at the intersection of T116
Remnants: Liberty Hill (Hill Grove) Cemetery on top of a hill west of Highland Ridge Rd southeast of the GPS coordinates, former one-room schoolhouse on the south side of Highland Ridge Rd about 3/4 of a mile north of the GPS coordinates
Description: It was a farming town with a school & grange hall. Thomas Elison was the first postmaster. He was succeeded by Robert Bess.

Morris – Decatur Township
Location: unknown
Description: Morris was on the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad in the late 1800s to early 1900s west of Cutler along Big Run Rd. It was listed on the Ohio map in the 1901 cram atlas. 

Muskingum – Ludlow Township
Post Office: 1881 – 1911
Location: 39.555464, -81.222200
on T67 (Township Rd 67) along Sacket Run between SR 26 & SR 260
Remnants: abandoned road with former farm building on the east side of the GPS coordinates
Description: Robert Mulinex (1820 – 1894) & Nancy (Brill) Mulinex from Virginia (1819 – 1902) owned a packing plant on the west side of T67 near the GPS coordinates.  Isaac R. Rinard (1824 – 1899) was the first postmaster. He was buried with relatives about 10 miles southeast of town in New Matamoras Cemetery on Cemetery Rd in Grandview Township. David Mulinex (1844 – 1911), a son of Robert & Nancy, was the last postmaster. The office was discontinued when he passed away. Robert, Nancy, & David were buried with relatives in Liberty (Evangelical United Brethren) Cemetery about 7 miles northwest of town on the north side of Liberty Ridge Rd.

Newberry (Newberry Settlement) (Newbury) – Belpre Township
Location: 39.225109, -81.701405
on 
Newbury Rd (State Rte 124) at the intersection of T502 along the Ohio River
Remnants: Newberry (Newbury Community) Cemetery at the GPS coordinates
Description: Long before the Armenia post office was established in the area, & just 2 years after Marietta was founded, Newberry became one of the earliest settled places in the state. Its
 land stretched from around Belpre Township’s western border over to present-day Little Hocking north of the GPS coordinates. Truman Guthrie (1765 – 1841) from Litchfield County, Connecticut arrived in 1790 to clear land for himself & his father, Joseph Guthrie (1733 – 1808), who was a member of the Ohio Land Company. Truman married Elizabeth (Stone) Guthrie (1771 – 1851) from Worcester County, Massachusetts in 1796 & had 8 children. He is also credited with planting the first wheat crop in Ohio with seed obtained during a harvest Pennsylvania. Revolutionary War veteran Nathaniel Sawyer (1757 – 1813), who owned the land where Little Hocking now stands, named the Newberry Setttlement after Newburyport, Massachusetts where he lived before moving to Ohio. Nathaniel built the first corn cracker, a predecessor to 1800s grist mills, next to Sawyer Run. Newberry also had a fortified stockade, as many settlements in Ohio did before the close of the War Of 1812, built for protection against Native Americans. They were a useful necessity but, of course, required both getting into them in time & successfully defending them to save settlers lives. A couple of the early recorded burials in Newberry Cemetery are that of a Mrs. Brown & Persis Dunhan who were killed in an attack on the fort on March 15, 1792. Newberry updated its name to Newbury in the mid-1800s & had a meeting house on the north side of Township Rd 299 & a school on the south side of the cemetery. Both of those were listed on the 1858 county map. The Guthrie family was laid to rest in Newberry Cemetery. Nathaniel Sawyer moved away & was buried with relatives in Pioneer Cemetery on the north side of SR 329 between Federal Creek & the Hocking River in Stewart in Rome Township, Athens County.

North Union – Wesley Township
Post Office: 1851 – 1858
Location: 39.381090, -81.834263
on Mayle Ridge Rd (C96) at the intersection of Southland Cemetery Rd (Township Rd 217)
Remnants: Southland Mission Cemetery on the west side of Southland Cemetery Rd about 1/3 of a mile south of the GPS coordinates
Description: North Union had a meeting house on the south side of Mayle Ridge Rd west of the GPS coordinates & the general store with its post office was in the lot on the east side of the GPS coordinates. Joel Gilbert (1816 – 1890) was the first postmaster. He moved out of the county & was buried in Friends Cemetery on the west side of SR 377 south of Kennard Rd in Penn Township, Morgan County just northwest of Pennsville. Thomas Bundy (1815 – 1884) was the last postmaster. He was buried with his wife Ruth W. Bundy (1813 – 1886) in Friends Cemetery about 4 & 1/2 miles north of town on T210 of off SR 555.

Olga – Salem Township
Post Office: 1888 – 1899
Location: unknown
Description: Olga was located near Warner. Civil War veteran William L. Gardner (1842 – 1916) from Coshocton County was the postmaster. He later moved & was buried with his second wife, Catherine (Stegner) Gardner (1852 – 1930), in Prospect Cemetery at the intersection of SR 73 & Prospect Rd in Washington Township, Highland County.

Ormiston – Barlow Township
Post Office: 1890 – 1901
Location: 39.425778, -81.620138
on Anderson Rd (C2) at the intersection of Fisher Ridge Rd (Township Rd 29)
Remnants: none known
Description: The original proprietors were James Ormiston (1768 – 1849) & Chirstina (Lamb) Ormiston (1769 – 1852).  They moved to the U.S. from Scotland & settled in Barlow Township in 1831. In the mid-1800s, the town had a school in the lot on the northwest side of the GPS coordinates on land donated by James & Christina & a saw mill along South Branch Wolf Creek on land owned by the Turner family. A newer school was built on the Turner farm on the east side of Fisher Ridge Rd & was listed in the 1875 county atlas. One of the grandsons of James & Christina, Civil War Alexander Ormiston (1835 – 1927) was the town’s postmaster & operated a general store on his 90 acre farm at the GPS coordinates. He buried with relatives in Barlow Central Cemetery about 3 & 1/2 miles southwest of the GPS coordinates on the north side of SR 550. James & Christina were buried with relatives 2 & 1/2 miles south of the GPS coordinates in Old Fleming Cemetery on private property on the east side of Anderson Rd.

Palmers Settlement (Browns Mills) – Palmer Township
Location: 39.467608, -81.714381
Post Office: 1819 – 1903
on SR 676 between Buchanan Rd (C6) & Brownrigg Rd
Remnants: Palmer United Methodist Church & former school at the GPS coordinates, Gard (Palmer) Cemetery 1 mile northwest of the GPS coordinates on Gard Cemetery Rd off of SR 676, old houses & farm buildings in the area
Description: Joseph Palmer Jr. (1761 – 1831) & Hannah (Fox) Palmer (1763 – 1836) were both born in Windham County, Connecticut & arrived in the area in 1802 along with their 5 children. In 1803, they purchased a farm at the GPS coordinates & had another daughter. Joseph became the first justice of the peace in Palmer Township & served in the state legislature. Samuel Brown (1781 – 1872) from Hampshire County, Massachusetts built a mill next to West Branch Wolf Creek for the firm of Sharp & Hunt. Samuel subsequently purchased the mill & opened the post office. The office moved from Wolf Creek to Palmers Settlement in the mid-1800s & the town took on its name. Several succeeding postmasters filled the position with the office moving around to their various residences. Palmer United Methodist Church was constructed in 1837 on the old family homestead. It was restored in 1877 & again in 1892. The town’s last school across from the church was built in 1856 & served as a meeting hall. There were also a few general stores in the community in the 1800s, including a couple on the Palmer farm on the west side of SR 676 south of the school. 
Gard (Palmer) Cemetery was established in 1817. Everyone mentioned in this listing was buried there with relatives & many pioneers from the area. The Palmer, Brown, & Gard families were all related by marriage.

Stowes – Muskingum Township (formerly in Union Township)
Location: 39.513833, -81.477126
on Muskingum River Rd (Township Rd 32) along the Muskingum River between Lowell & Rainbow
Remnants: none known
Description: James Smith Stowe (1806 – 1895) was born in Meigs County & moved to Muskingum Township at the age of 20. He started a river shipping business with flatboats in 1829, delivering local produce & goods down the Ohio & Mississippi Rivers for several decades. James also dealt in land speculation, investing around $90,000 in bottom farm lands around the area. He was married 3 times, had 11 children, & was buried with relatives 2 & 1/2 miles south of the GPS coordinates in Rainbow Cemetery on Rainbow Cemetery Rd.

Ward (Wards Station) – Grandview Township
Post Office: 1882 – 1907
Location: 39.499897, -81.150359
on C9 (Co Rd 9) at the instersection of T422 (Hackthorn Cemetery Rd)
Remnants: Hackathorn Cemetery at the southern end of T422, Bell Cemetery at the intersection of C9 & Ward Rd (Township Rd 421)
Description: The town was founded by James Ward (1813 – 1901) from Pennsylvania & Margaret (Leeper) Ward (1815 – 1899). They got married in 1834, had 7 children, & moved to Grandview Township in 1845. While driving through the area, or checking it out on current satellite maps, its tough to imagine there was once a rather densely populated community there. However, the 1875 county atlas & 1881 county history book confirmed its former bustling existence. A couple of James & Mararet’s sons, 
Albert Ward (1844 – 1919) & Joseph Ward (1846 – 1912) ran a general store on their parents land on the south side of C9 (Co Rd 9) just west of T422. Joseph served as the postmaster for the first year or so, & Albert took on the position for the remainder of its operation. There was also a tie shop (string & rope) on the east side of the store, a shoe shop on Albert’s property across the road from the store, a blacksmith shop on the east side of the shoe shop, a school on the north side of Wards Hollow Rd, & a small Union church at Hackthorn Cemetery. A Methodist church was at Bell Cemetery a mile west of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of C9 & Wards Rd. James & Margaret were laid to rest in Grandview Cemetery about 6 miles northeast of town on Grandview Hill Rd in Matamoras. Albert was buried with relatives in East Lawn Memorial Park (Valley Cemetery) on SR 7 in Reno. Joseph was buried with relatives in Oak Grove Cemetery at the intersection of 8th St & Wooster St in Marietta.

Caywood, OH (Caywood’s Station) – (1790s – present farming town with fewer residences than in the past)

Classification: small town

Location: Fearing Township, Washington County – On Caywood Rd at the intersection of Lynch Church Rd

Caywood was settled in the 1790s by William Caywood (1777 – 1864) & named after him. It was never a big town but had a train station on the Cleveland & Marietta Railway. There was also a general store, several churches, & a post office that ran from 1871 – 1922. William is buried in Lynch Church Cemetery on Lynch Church Rd along with some of his relatives & other early families. Caywood lost a lot of residents over the years, but the area still goes by the same name.

Elba, OH – (1871 – present coal mining, farming, & railroad town partially destroyed by floods)

Classification: semi – ghost town

Location: Aurelias Township, Washington County – On SR 821 at the intersection of Elba Hill Rd (Town Hwy 278)

Elba was settled in the mid-1800s, mostly by German immigrants. It became a town in 1871 & was named by Frederick Kueck (1817 – 1876) after the island that Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled to, because they were both considered to be a “vast wilderness” at the time. Frederick donated land for a train station on the Cleveland & Marietta Railway. He also operated a general store at the Elba Station depot & was the first postmaster. The town had three general stores at its peak & most of the residents either worked in local coal mines or were farmers. The post office ran from 1871 – 1984.

Elba was originally located on US Hwy 21, but that changed when I-77 was built nearby. Some stretches of US 21 were abandoned & Elba ended up on SR 821. Its initial population decrease occurred as Elba lost its train station & travelers passed it by on I-77. The second demise that Elba faced was a series of floods. The first & worst of those was in 1998 when it rained over 13 inches in a single day & the banks of Duck Creek severely flooded. Two more floods ravaged Elba in 2004 in one week & the last one happened just four months later in 2005.

Elba Community Church, the Castle Hall of the Knights Of Pythias, & several other homes & buildings sit abandoned on SR 821. The town population is currently the smallest it has ever been. A lot of the land & buildings were purchased by the government to be demolished, but not much of that has happened yet. Frederick Kueck was buried in Mound Cemetery in Marietta with some of his family members.  

Thanks to group member Chelssie (Thompson) Hanson for providing listing lead & most of the info on Elba!

Marietta, OH – (1788 – present farming, river, & railroad town)

Classification: historic town

Location: City Of Marietta, Washington County – Exits off of I-77

Marietta was founded in 1788 at the confluence of the Muskingum & Ohio Rivers as the first permanent settlement in the state, & the first U.S. settlement west of the original 13 colonies. The town quickly grew to be one of the most important in Ohio history. On top of being a river town, Marietta was a major transportation hub with several cargo & passenger railroad stations in the mid-1800s to mid-1900s.

Ohio Historical Marker #14 – 84 at 428 Fort St tells the tale of  Meriwether Lewis’s arrival in the area on his way to meet up with William Clark for their great expedition of the Northwest Territory. Marker #20 – 84 at 601 Front St & the Ohio River Museum has info about the Underground Railroad on the Muskingum River. Ohio Historical Marker #11 – 84 at 601 Second St has a story about the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.

There are also a ton of historical buildings in Marietta including the Anchorage House on Putnam Ave. It was built in 1854 – 1859 & is said to be haunted by the ghost of Eliza (Whipple) Putman (1809 – 1862) who lived there & hosted lavish parties. Another interesting home, The Castle, is now on the National Register of Historic Places. It was built in 1855 & purchased by John Newton Esq. who was the owner of the Marietta Bucket Factory. The Castle is supposedly haunted by the ghost of Jessie (Davis) Lindsay. She lived there 85 years & died in 1974. It opened for tours in 1994. The Lafayette Hotel & a few other buildings also have reported hauntings.

Rainbow, OH – (1795 – present early Ohio River town with little growth)

Classification: small town

Location: Muskingum Township, Washington County – On Muskingam River Rd (Town Rd 32)

In 1795 some settlers from Marietta drew lots for 27 plats of land near the mouth of Rainbow Creek. The creek & town were named for the rainbow shaped route that the Muskingum River takes through the area. Revolutionary War veteran Isaac Stone (1749 – 1808) & Lydia (Barrett) Stone (1751 – 1792) were the first to move there & had several children, but later got divorced & both remarried. They were followed by the Stacy family & several other families that won plats.

Ship building, mills, & farming were the main sources of income in Rainbow. During the Civil War, many of the residents went to fight for the Union & Thomas Ridgeway, an avid abolitionist, helped nearly 100 slaves escape to freedom on the Underground Railroad at his house by the river. The town had a train station on the B & O Railroad & a post office that ran from 1888 – 1903.  Issac Stone & many other early residents are buried at Rainbow Cemetery on Rainbow Cemetery Rd (Township Rd 513).

50
1888 Washington County Map

Washington County Ohio Ghost Towns Research Resources

1858 – Washington County Map

1875 – Washington County Atlas

1910 – Washington County Map

1877 – Washington County And The Early Settlement Of Ohio

1881 – History Of Washington County Ohio

1902 – History Of Marietta And Washington County Ohio – Vol. 1

1902 – History Of Marietta And Washington County Ohio – Vol. 2