Babbtown (Fairmount) (Fair Mount) – Bethel Township
Post Office: 1846 – 1857
Location: 39.970314 -84.139422
on SR 202 along Honey Creek between SR 571 & Tipp – Elizabeth Rd
Remnants: Kepper (Old Jackson) Cemetery on the west side of SR 202 with an access road north of the GPS coordinates
Description: It was founded by Daniel Babb (1799 – 1881) from Pennsylvania & Leah (Littler) Babb (1804 – 1872) from Virginia. They got married in 1823, had 8 children, & purchased a grist mill next to Honey Creek in 1831. The mill was constructed in 1815 by David Staley (1791 – 1862) from Maryland. Daniel & Leah also owned a general store, cooper shop, & blacksmith shop. There was a post office in the store called Fairmount, with Daniel holding the postmaster position, but residents affectionately called the village Babbtown. Daniel closed the mill in 1873 & the town didn’t make it into the 1900s. The Babbs & David Staley were buried with relatives in Kepper Cemetery.

Conquest
Post Office: 1839 – 1842
Location: unknown
Description: John Bowers was the postmaster.

County Line (Pigeye) – Union Township, Miami County & Randolph Township, Montgomery County
Location: 39.922841 -84.311900
on SR 48 (S Miami St) at the intersection of N Montgomery County Line Rd along Pigeye Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: County Line didn’t last long as a town, but it had a grist mill, saw mill, school, & a train station on the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad during its existence.

Ellemans – Newton & Union Township
Post Office: 1880 – 1883
Location: 40.008288 -84.339398
on SR 48 at the intersection of W Horseshoe Bend Rd along Rocky Run
Remnants: Union Joint (Old Union) Cemetery north of Horseshoe Bend Rd with an access road east of the GPS coordinates
Description: Ellemans was on the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad. The proprietors were Thomas Elleman (1841 – 1925) & Martha (Jay) Elleman (1839 – 1893), both born in Miami County. They were married in 1858 & had 9 children. Thomas was the town’s postmaster. Martha’s paternal grandmother was a member of the Coppock family who owned much of the land in the area, including the cemetery lot which also had a church. Thomas & Martha were buried with relatives in Union Joint Cemetery.

Hanktown (Randolph) (Randolph Settlement) – Union Township
Location: 39.987659 -84.381850
on SR 571 between S Shiloh Rd & S Range Line Rd
Remnants: Hanktown Cemetery on the north side of SR 571 at the GPS coordinates, historical marker at the cemetery
Description: It was founded by freed slaves from John Randolph’s (1773 – 1833) plantation in Virginia. He was a cousin of 3rd U.S. President Thomas Jefferson. After 13 years of sorting out John’s many wills, the freed slaves arrived in the area in 1846. Many of the residents made a journey to seek settlement in Mercer & Shelby County prior to the Civil War. A few stayed in those counties, but most ended up returning to Hanktown. There was a Baptist church at the cemetery & a school across the road. Among the town’s residents, 7 of them joined the Union Army during the Civil War.   

Jimtown – Washington Township
Location: 40.111033 -84.278094
on Stillwell Rd at the intersection of Bausman Rd
Remnants: Gangloff house in the northwest lot of the intersection
Description: Jimtown’s main industry was farming. It had a school in the southeast corner of the intersection. Felix Gangloff (1861 – 1950) & Theresa (Antauer) Gangloff (1895 – 1941) owned the now abandoned house in the farm field in the northwest lot of the intersection. Felix was a son of German immigrants & Theresa moved to Ohio from Austria with her parents. They were married in 1917 & had a daughter. The family was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery about 5 miles northeast of the GPS coordinates on SR 66 on the north side of Piqua. 

Jordans – Springcreek Township
Location: unknown
Description: It was between Piqua & Fletcher on the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago, & St. Louis Railroad (Panhandle Route) & was named after a branch of the Jordan family in the township.

Meyers – Washington & Newberry Township
Location: 40.131063 -84.316984
on Newberry – Washington South Rd at the former railroad crossing between US 36 & Piqua – Clayton Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: Meyers was between Covington & Piqua on the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago, & St. Louis Railroad (Panhandle Route.  Its proprietors were Joseph Myers (1848 – 1934) & Mary (Brinkman) Myers (1853 – 1919). They were buried with relatives about 3 miles west of town in Highland (Covington) Cemetery at the intersection of SR 48 & W Ingle Rd on the north side of Covington.

Petersons (Petersons Station) – Staunton Township
Post Office: 1855 – 1860
Location: 40.107213 -84.213985
on W Peterson Rd at the railroad crossing between Piqua – Troy Rd & Troy – Sidney Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: It was founded by Ralph Peterson (1800 – 1888) & Sarah (Hardenbrook) Peterson (1803 – 1888). They got married in 1822, settled in Miami County in 1827, & had 11 children. Like many early pioneering families, the Petersons lived in a log cabin until they could afford to build a frame house after continually clearing & improving their 160 acre farm. Ralph also served as county commissioner. The town was on the Dayton & Michigan Railroad (later the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton) & had a train station & warehouse on the north side of W Peterson Rd at the GPS coordinates. A school was on the east side of Orbison Rd on land owned by the Willard family. Ralph & Sarah were buried with relatives about 3 miles south of town in Raper Chapel Cemetery on the west side of Troy – Piqua Rd. 

Rag Town (Ragtown) – Elizabeth Township
Location: 40.001021 -84.124970
on Walnut Grove – Clark County Rd at the intersection of S Rudy Rd along Pleasant Run
Remnants: Martin (Hart) (Walnut Grove) Cemetery on the north side of Walnut Grove – Clark County Rd west of the GPS coordinates
Description: Rag Town was named after its wool factory whose main product was cloth rags. Henry Carver (1816 – 1890) & Permilia (Knoop) Carver (1819 – 1904) were the last owners of the mill. They were married in 1843, had 6 children, & a 423 acre farm. The town also had a school in a farm field northwest of the cemetery & a saw mill next to Pleasant Run north of the wool mill owned by Irish immigrants Robert Sproul (1775 – 1858) & Isabella (Haynes) Sproul (1782 – 1859). They had 12 children & were buried with relatives in Casstown Cemetery north of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of N Children’s Home Rd & McCandliss Rd. Henry & Permilia Carver were buried with relatives in Riverside Cemetery on Riverside Dr in Troy. Most of the town’s residents were buried in Martin Cemetery. 

Rangeville – Newberry Township
Location: 40.181215 -84.394498
on Versailles Rd (Co Hwy 28) at the intersection of Frankman Rd
Remnants: Friedens Lutheran Church & Cemetery 1 mile west of the GPS coordinates on the south side of Versailles Rd, old houses & farms in the area
Description: Rangeville was on the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad & had a school (Newberry Township No. 5) on the south side of Versailles Rd east of the GPS coordinates. The Routson & Apple families were the most influential in Rangeville & still have descendants living in the area. Many of their members were buried in Friedens Cemetery.

Rowdyville – Newton & Newberry Township
Location: 40.095450 -84.342992
on Marlin Rd between SR 48 & N Rench Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: none found

Sodom – Lostcreek Township
Location: 40.087491 -84.070800
on Troy Urbana Rd (Co Hwy 193) at the intersection of Sodom Rd
Remnants: Lost Creek United Church at the intersection, Sodom Cemetery behind the church
Description: Sodom had a school & a shingle factory on the north side of Troy Urbana Rd west of the GPS coordinates on land owned by the Long family. James Pence (1821 – 1883) from Warren County & Nancy (Shidler) Pence (1820 – 1908) from Pennsylvania owned a blacksmith shop at the southwest corner of the intersection & donated land for the church. They were married in 1841, had 8 children, & a large farm. James & Nancy were buried with relatives 7 miles northwest of town in Fletcher Cemetery on Church St (Casstown  – Fletcher Rd) just north of US 36.

Summitville – Newberry Township
Location: 40.161378 -84.327057
on SR 185 at the intersection of Mulberry Grove – Rakestraw Rd (Co Hwy 32)
Remnants: former one-room schoolhouse at the intersection of SR 185 & N McMaken Rd
Description: There wasn’t much to this small farming town besides the school (Newberry Township No. 12) which is currently a private residence. The land for it was donated by Henry Rike (1821 – 1883). He was buried with relatives in Davids Cemetery on Mad River Rd in Kettering, Montgomery County.

Tadmor (Tadmer) –  Bethel Township, Miami County & Butler Township, Montgomery County
Post Office: 1867 – 1917
Location: 39.89526 -84.165561
on hiking trails in Taylorsville Metropark along the Great Miami River
Description: Tadmor was founded on land owned by the Sutherland family & became a transportation hub as it sat at important crossroads next to the Miami & Erie Canal. It had two train stations. One of them was on the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad & another on the Dayton & Michigan Railroad with a general store & grain elevator. The post office went by the name Tadmer from 1867 – 1884, then Tadmor from 1884 – 1917. Most of the town’s residents had already moved north to the National Road (US 40) a few years before The Great Flood Of 1913, which destroyed almost everything that was left of Tadmor. It was completely abandoned by 1922. There are several old cemeteries in the area where the citizens of Tadmor were buried & some remnants of the town on the hiking trails in Taylorsville Metropark off of the Great Miami River Recreational Trail.

Twin Lakes – Springcreek & Staunton Township
Location: 40.121749 -84.214627
on W Loy Rd between I-75 & Free Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area
Description: The proprietors were John Loy (1821 – 1910) from Butler County & Cynthia (Buckles) Loy (1831 – 1921). They had 9 children & a 160 acre farm. John was a carpenter & contractor. A natural spring on the Loy farm was used to create 2 lakes for stocked fish ponds, hence the town’s name. They were on the southern half of the Loy farm & can be spotted in the 1911 county atlas. Although the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad rolled through the area, it didn’t add much to the stature of Twin Lakes. John & Cynthia were buried with relatives in Forest Hill Cemetery about 6 miles northwest of town on SR 66 on the north side of Piqua.

Winans Station – Staunton Township
Location: 40.079515 -84.205802
on Piqua – Troy Rd at the intersection of Eldean Rd
Remnants: Raper Chapel Cemetery on the west side of Piqua – Troy Rd south of the GPS coordinates
Description: It was founded by Richard Winans (1781 – 1863) & Sarah (Ross) Winans (1788 – 1858). They were married in 1807 & moved to Ohio from New Jersey later that same year. The relocation of their lives took 41 days. It started with an ox team & wagon from New Jersey to Wheeling, West Virginia, then by flatboat on the Ohio River to Cincinnati, & back in the ox wagon up to the newly formed Miami County. The town had a train station on the Dayton & Michigan Railroad (later the Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton) & a church. Richard & Sarah were buried with relatives in Raper Chapel Cemetery.

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Miami County Ohio Ghost Towns Research Resources

1858 – Miami County Map

1871 – Miami County Atlas

1875 – Miami County Atlas

1894 – Miami County Atlas

1911 – Miami County Atlas

1880 – History Of Miami County Ohio

1900 – A Genealogical And Biographical History Of Miami County Ohio

1909 – Centennial History Troy, Piqua, And Miami County Ohio