Amity – Berlin Township (formerly in Trumbull County)
Post Office: 1828 – 1838
Location: 41.054522, -80.922228
on Ellsworth Rd at the intersection of Weaver Rd (Township Hwy 49)
Remnants: none known
Description: The town was founded by War of 1812 veteran General Peter Musser Jr. (1782 – 1852) from Frederick County, Maryland and Nancy (Newcomer) Musser (1782 – 1866) from Pennsylvania. Peter’s parents previously founded Petersburg in Springfield Township. Amity had a tavern and inn at the Musser residence and Peter was the postmaster. Peter and Nancy moved after the post office was discontinued and were buried with relatives in Old Champion (Presbyterian) Cemetery at the intersection of SR 45 (Mahoning Ave) and Champion Ave W in Champion Township, Trumbull County.  

Bentley – Poland Township
Location: unknown
Description: It was named after the Bentley family in the county and was along the Lawrence Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the late 1800s to early 1900s. The town was last spotted on an 1898 railroad map.

Boswell – Goshen Township
Post Office: 1850 – 1888
Location: 40.950638, -80.954836
on SR 534 (S Pricetown Rd) at the intersection of SR 14 (Cleveland – East Liverpool Rd)
Remnants: none known
Description: Boswell’s heyday was in the 1870s with a general store, blacksmith shop, shoe shop, and a school on the south side of town in the northwest corner of the intersection of SR 534 and SR 165 (S Range). William H. Arnold (1840 – 1893) was the last postmaster. He was buried with relatives in Canfield Cemetery about 15 miles northeast of the GPS coordinates on the south side of US 224 (E Main St) in Canfield.

Hillsville – Poland Township
Location: unknown
Description: I
t was named after Hillsville, Pennsylvania and was along the Lawrence Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the late 1800s to early 1900s. The town was last spotted on an 1898 railroad map.

Kirk – Jackson Township
Post Office: 1896 – 1901
Location: 41.068918, -80.823566
on Kirk Rd (Co Rd 146) at the intersection of S Lipkey Rd
Remnants: Covenanter Cemetery on the side of Kirk Rd east of the GPS coordinates
Description: The town was founded by Irish immigrants Robert Kirkpatrick (1768 – 1847) and Catherine (Ewing) Kirkpatrick (1769 – 1856). 
Their surname was later Americanized and shortened to Kirk. Covenantor Cemetery started out on the Ewing family farm and dates back to at least the early 1820s. Catherine’s widowed mother, Ann Ewing (1738  – 1821), is the oldest known interment and made the journey to the U.S. in 1792 along with 4 of her children. The Kirkpatrick and Ewing families were related by several marriages. In the later 1800s, there was a church at the cemetery and a school on the east side of S Lipkey Rd north of the GPS coordinates. The school was on land donated by William Young (1804 – 1885) from Beaver County, Pennsylvania and his 3rd wife, Ellen (Wallace) Young (1818 – 1880). Everyone previously mentioned in this listing was laid to rest in Covenantor Cemetery. Nettie (Haun) Slabaugh (b. 1867) was the town’s postmaster. We have as of yet been unable to locate her grave.

Lake Shore Junction – Coitsville Township
Location: unknown
Description: The town name refers to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway.

Loveland (Loveland Station) (Marquis) – Green and Canfield Township
Post Office: 1871 – 1890
Location: 40.988220, -80.763659
on W Western Reserve Rd at the intersection of Washingtonville Rd along Indian Run
Remnants: former railroad path on the northwest and southwest side of the intersection
Description: The original propritors were David Loveland (1801 – 1878) and Lydia (Pyle) Loveland (1808 – 1877) who donated land for a train station on the Niles & New Lisbon Railroad (later bought by the Erie Railroad). Its former track path heading north from the intersection is currently part of the Mill Creek Metroparks Bikeway. The track path heading south is getting reclaimed by nature. Loveland had a mill, an Evangelical church, and a school in the northwest corner of the intersection of SR 46 (Columbia – Canfield Rd) and W Western Reserve Rd. Its post office was called Loveland Station because there was already an office named Loveland in Clermont County. David and Lydia had a few children and were buried with relatives in Poland Riverside Cemetery about 11 miles northeast of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of US 224 (E McKinley Way) and Riverside Dr in Poland. Lewis Templin (1812 – 1899) from Berks County, Pennsylvania was the town’s only known postmaster. He was buried with relatives in Christian (Disciple Church) Cemetery 5 miles southwest of the GPS coordinates a the intersection of SR 165 (S Range) and Beaver Creek Rd. The area of Loveland now goes by the name Marquis.

Nebo – Poland Township
Location: 41.048563, -80.573925
on Loweville Rd between Narcissa St and Arrel Smith Rd at the confluence of Hines Run and the Mahoning River
Remnants: none known
Description: Nebo was a mining and railroad town on the Pittsburgh, Youngstown, & Ashtabula Railroad in the late 1800s to early 1900s. Iron and coal were mined from the area to help feed the iron works at Lowellville. Coal was also previously exported to Cleveland on the Pennsylvania & Ohio Canal.

Newport – Poland Township
Location: 41.053335, -80.573812
on SR 289 (Broad St) between New Castle Rd and Coit Rd along the Mahoning River
Remnants: none known
Description: It was directly across the Mahoning River from Nebo and first appeared as a platted town in the 1875 county atlas. Some of the lots sold for relatively high prices, as much as those in Lowellville at the time. However, Newport failed to attract businesses and enough residents to create the village that was once hoped for on paper.

Park Place – City of Youngstown (formerly in Youngstown Township)
Location: 41.117948, -80.657318
on Belmont Ave at the intersection of Emerson Pl
Remnants: none known
Description: Park Place was listed in the 1875 county atlas and was eventually annexed by Youngstown. Flint Hill, Kyles Corners, and Lansingville are some of the other formerly separate towns that were also absorbed by Youngstown as it grew.

Scotts Corners – Milton Township, Mahoning County, and Palmyra Township, Portage County
Location: 41.073028, -81.002339
on Mahoning Portage County Line Rd at the 5-way intersection of Scotts Corners Rd, Ellsworth Rd, and Williams Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: The proprietors were Alexander Scott (born c. 1827) from Pennsylvania and Harriet Scott. They owned about 350 acres of land in southwest Milton Township and had several children.

Shaw Junction – Poland Township
Location: unknown
Description: I
t was was along the Lawrence Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the late 1800s to early 1900s between Bentley and Hillsville. The town was last spotted on an 1898 railroad map.

Snyder – Beaver Township
Location: 40.929323, -80.663668
on W Pine Lake Rd (Township Hwy 20) at the railroad crossing between SR 164 (South Ave) and SR 7 (Market St)
Remnants: none known
Description: John J. Snyder (1833 – 1906) from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and Rebecca (Miller) Snyder (1835 – 1907) donated land for train tracks and a station between Columbiana and North Lima. They were buried with relatives in Good Hope Lutheran (Mount Olivet) Cemetery 2 miles north of the GPS coordinates at the intersection of SR 164 and SR 165 (S Range) in North Lima.

Subrosa – Springfield Township
Post Office: 1892 – 1904
Location: 40.943799, -80.541196
on SR 170 (Youngstown – Pittsburgh Rd) at the intersection of E South Range Rd
Remnants: Old Springfield United Church Of Christ and Cemetery on the northeast side of the intersection
Description: Subrosa had a school on the west side of SR 170 just south of the GPS coordinates. Jonathan Miller was the last known postmaster.

Teutonia – Springfield Township (formerly in Columbiana County)
Location: unknown
Description: It was a Utopian community founded by settlers of German descent in 1827, led by Peter Kaufmann (1800 – 1869) who was a printer, philosopher, and educator. Their group was called The Society Of United Germans. The town had a school and published a newspaper called A Herald Of A Better Time. Those who joined the community agreed to share everything they had for 10 years, but could leave at any time with their share of the profits that the group made. Aside from keeping the town going, funds were also used to help free slaves and evangelize Native Americans. The community disbanded in 1831 shortly after Peter moved to Canton in Stark County. Peter was buried with his wife, Catherine Kaufmann (1800 – 1894) in Rowland Cemetery on SR 172 (Tuscarawas St E) in Canton.

Williams Corners
Location: unknown
Description: It was about 6 miles northeast of Salem.

Ohltown, OH – (early 1800s to present farming and mill town)

Classification: small town

Location: Austintown Township, Mahoning County and Weathersfield Township, Trumbull County – On Ohltown Rd north of I-80

The town was founded by Michael Ohl (1784 -1857) and Eva (Moyers) Ohl (1786 – 1860). They were married in 1838 and had 8 children. Michael constructed a saw mill and grist mill in 1844 on the banks of the Meander Creek, operated a hotel, and was the first postmaster of the post office that ran from 1841 – 1902. The first church in Ohltown was built in 1838, a school in 1857, and a bank in 1868. During the 1880s the town also had about 30 houses, a blacksmith shop, 2 stores, a newer grist mill, and a train station on the Niles & New Lisbon Railroad. Many of the local residents worked in coal mines or at the Meander Iron Furnace.

There are several Ohl descendants buried in Ohl Town Cemetery next to the United Methodist Church at the intersection of Ohltown Rd and Austintown Warren Rd. It’s right across the Mahoning County border in Trumbull County. Michael and Eva Ohl were buried in Old North Cemetery on SR 46 (N Broad St) in Canfield. Today Ohltown is basically a suburb squeezed between Youngstown, Austintown, and the Meander Creek Reservoir.

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1888 Mahoning County Map

Mahoning County, Ohio Ghost Towns Research Resources

1860 – Mahoning County map

1874 – Mahoning County atlas

1915 – Mahoning County atlas

1882 – History of Trumbull and Mahoning Counties – Vol. 1

1882 – History of Trumbull and Mahoning Counties – Vol. 2

1921 – History of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley, Ohio – Vol. 1

1921 – History of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley, Ohio – Vol. 2