Baker – Jackson Township
Post Office: 1830 – 1862 & 1882 – 1882
Location: 40.072465 -83.960987  
on St Paris – New Carlisle Rd along Blacksnake Creek between SR 55 & Troy Urbana Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area
Description: It was founded by a branch of the Baker family in the township & just had the post office & a small cluster of houses. 

Brush Lake – Rush Township
Location: 40.168228 -83.577191 
on Brush Lake Rd at the former railroad track crossing between McCarty Rd & Urbana Woodstock Pike
Remnants: none known
Description: The earliest known settlement was by William Pickerell who built a grist mill on the stream leading out of the lake in 1803. James Glendening (1795 – 1876) & Mary (Van Horn) Glendening (1793 – 1858) moved to Ohio from Virginia in 1829. Shortly after that, they purchased 155 acres surrounding Brush Lake. James & Mary had 12 children in total. 8 of them survived to adulthood. Brush Lake was a fine farming town but didn’t have much else other than a local township school & a picnic ground south of the lake across the former railroad tracks. It was on the Pan Handle Route of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PCC & St. L) but was likely just a flag stop. James & Mary were buried with relatives in Black Cemetery on the north side of Dunn Burton Rd.  

Clover Run – Union Township
Location: 40.032806 -83.603589 
on Brigner Rd southwest of SR 56
Remnants: Hopewell Cemetery on the north side of the GPS coordinates 
Description: Its only notoriety was from a brutal brawl between Solomon Weaver & Philip Groves, due to a sort of Romeo & Juliet type of relationship between their children. Solomon’s oldest daughter Anna was 18 at the time & was courted by one of Philip’s sons, James Groves. The fathers didn’t care for each other at all, simply because of where they lived, the Groves family on Clover Run & the Weaver family on the Darby Plains. They had an encounter at William Kelly’s tavern in Mechanicsburg where an election was being held on November 8, 1837. After getting into a heated argument, William, who was also the constable, suggested they duke it out. The fight lasted about an hour with both men sustaining substantial wounds. The onlooking crowd feared them dead as they laid on the ground & neither could move a muscle. Solomon & Philip were treated by doctors & eventually recovered. They later made amends & gave consent to the courtship between their children.  

Coffin Station (Coffins) – Mad River Township
Location: 40.040058 -83.902988 
on Thackery Rd at the railroad crossing between the intersections of Coffin Station Rd along Chapman Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: Eliza J. Coffin donated land for a train station on the Ohio Southern Railroad.

Concord Mills – Concord & Mad River Township
Location: 40.130027 -83.809881 
on Millerstown Rd at the intersection of River Rd along Mad River
Remnants: Kenton Memorial Cemetery on the north side of Millerstown Road west of River Rd 
Description: The town was originally settled in the first decade of the 1800s & had several grist & saw mills on Mad River & Muddy Creek over the decades. They were mostly built by the Arrowsmith & Kenton families. Mason Arrowsmith (1806 – 1880) provided a lengthy description of the area’s early days for the 1872 History Of Champaign And Logan Counties. His maternal grandfather, William Kenton (1737 – 1822), also lived in Concord Mills & was a brother of famed frontiersman & war veteran Simon Kenton (1755 – 1836). Simon saved the settlers of Concord Mills from complete annihilation by local natives, led by Shawnee Chief Tecumseh, when Mason was just 6 weeks old. Simon’s appearance & warning to the natives deterred them from attacking. Mason was buried with many relatives in Kenton Memorial Cemetery.

Crimville – Goshen & Rush Township
Location: 40.131476 -83.583439 
on US 36 at the intersection of Parkview Rd
Remnants: Treacle Cemetery on the east side of  Parkview Rd south of the intersection
Description: Crimville was named after John Crim who operated a store in the northwest corner of Goshen Township. A Methodist Episcopal Church stood at Treacle Cemetery & a mill across the street along Treacle Creek was owned by the Woodward family. It was discontinued in the late 1870s, sold in 1883, & was moved & converted to a barn. The chruch, cemetery, & mill all predated the town. Crimville only had a few residences but made it onto some maps in the early 1900’s.

Dallas – Urbana Township
Location: 40.047545 -83.779188 
on US 68 at the intersection of Dallas Rd
Remnants: none known 
Description: It was founded by James Dallas (1778 – 1871) from Ireland & Isabella (Sproat) Dallas (1788 – 1843) who had 9 children & a nice farm. They moved to the county around 1810. James was a judge & county commissioner. The town had a school & harness shop. The Atlantic & Great Western Railroad went through Dallas but it didn’t have a train station. James & Isabella were buried with relatives in Oak Dale Cemetery on Patrick Ave in Urbana. 

Funk – Salem Township
Location: 40.170042 -83.744272
on US 68 at the intersection of Kingscreek Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area
Description: The town was founded by Daniel Funk (1786 – 1879) & Frances (Kenaga) Funk (1784 – 1867) who moved to Ohio from Pennsylvania in 1837 & had 3 children. The section of US 68 where the town stood used to be the southern portion of Funk Rd. It was a good farming town but didn’t have any other big industries & fell off the maps before 1900 as it couldn’t keep up with Kingscreek. Daniel & Frances were buried with relatives in Oak Dale Cemetery on Patrick Ave in Urbana.

Fyffe
Post Office: 1858 – 1859
Location: unknown
Description: It was named after the Fyffe family in the county.

Gourdville – Concord Township
Location: 40.146735 -83.842770
on Church Rd at its curve about 3/4 of a mile south of Concord Church & Cemetery
Remnants: none known
Description: It was stated in the 1917 History Of Champaign County  that the name of the pioneer who founded the town had been lost to time. Gourdville never had more than 3 houses & wasn’t incorporated. Its last known residents were James Blue & Tubal Woodard (1806 – 1881) & Margaret (Salkeld) Woodard (1813 – 1896). The Woodards were buried in Concord Cemetery at the intersection of SR 560 & Church Rd, but its existence isn’t attributed to Gourdville.

Hagenbaugh (Long) – Salem Township
Post Office: 1896 – 1902
Location: 40.144917 -83.700555
on Jackson Hill Rd at the former railroad track crossing west of Stone Quarry Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area, former school on SR 296
Description: This farming & railroad village was founded by Henry Hagenbuch (1811 – 1881) from Pennsylvania & Martha (Long) Hagenbuch (1827 – 1887) from Champaign County. Their surname if of Dutch origin & was Americanized at some point in the late 1800s. The town had a train station on the Columbus, Piqua, & Indiana Railroad, some fish stock ponds, a stone quarry, & a school (Salem Twp Sub District #1). The school is currently a private residence on SR 296 just east of the former railroad track bed. Henry & Martha had a few children & were buried with relatives in Oak Dale Cemetery on Patrick Ave in Urbana. 

Hare – Urbana Township
Location: unknown
Description: none found

Harrison
Location: unknown
Description: 
It was listed in volume 1 of the 1917 county history book on page 1118 as a former town.

Heathtown – Concord Township
Post Office: 1852 – 1855
Location: 40.198948 -83.866737
on SR 29 at the intersection of Calland Rd south of Muddy Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: John Heath (1821 – 1887) was born in New Hampshire, moved to Ohio from New Jersey around 1838, & founded the Heathtown. He ran a shoe shop, grocery store, & opened a post office at the store called Muddy Creek. Heathtown also had a blacksmith shop. John moved to Iowa in 1854. A political movement by a group of local successful farmers called the Know – Nothing Party was established in Heathtown & had its headquarters there. Heathtown was last listed on the 1894 Champaign County map, but didn’t exist for much longer after that.

Heers – Salem Township
Location: unknown
Description: none found

Jennings Park – City of Urbana  (Formerly in Salem Township)
Location: 40.126667 -83.753056
on US 68 on the south side of Urbana Airport
Remnants: the location is still a privately owned farm
Description: Jennings Park appears to be more of a cultural locale than a town, but was considered to be a populated place for describing where residents lived & giving travel directions. Edward Jennings (1811 – 1906) from West Virginia & Anna (Bentley) Jennings (1823 – 1890) from Highland County, Ohio had 6 children. One of their sons, Absolom C. Jennings (1847 – 1883) owned the Nutwood Place farm along the Sandusky, Cincinnati, & Dayton Railroad. The farm dates back to 1815 & was added to the National Register Of Historic Places in 1976. Edward & Absalom were avid horse breeders & had a training & race track on the north side of the farmhouse. The portion of the farm where the track was is now on the airport grounds. 

Long (Hagenbaugh) – Salem Township
Location: 40.144917 -83.700555
on Jackson Hill Rd at the former railroad track crossing west of Stone Quarry Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area, former school on SR 296
Description: Prior to the arrival of the railroad in the area & the marriage of Henry & Martha (Long) Hagenbuch, the town was called Long. Martha’s parents James Long (1794 – 1862) from Pennsylvania & Susannah (Cheney) Long (1803 – 1887) from West Virginia owned the local stone quarry. Her brother, William Cheney Long (1834 – 1896), was a farmer & township trustee. He donated land for the former school on SR 296.  The Longs were buried in Kingscreek Cemetery at the intersection of Kingscreek Rd & Clark Rd.

Lookout – Johnson Township
Post Office: 1887 – 1901
Location: 40.194323 -84.011525
on Elm Tree Rd N between Anderson Rd & Walborn Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: It was a small farming & postal town founded by David Mahan (1851 – 1904) & Laura (Smoot) Mahan (1855 – 1915). David was the postmaster & received $15 a year for his service. His father Jason ran a saw mill on the family property that was marked on the Johnson Township page in the 1874 county atlas. Lookout also has a one-room schoolhouse on the east side of Elm Tree Rd south of the post office. The Mahans were buried in Rosedale Cemetery on the west side of SR 235 in Adams Township, Champaign County.

Magrew (Westville) – Mad River Township
Post Office: 1905 – 1915
Location: 40.101226 -83.819321
on Bair Rd along Anderson Creek at the former railroad track crossing between US 36 & Old Troy Pike
Remnants: none known
Description: Magrew was the name of the train station on the southeast outskirts of Westville. Lemuel Magrew (1829 – 1900) & Zalinda (Miller) Magrew (1828 – 1898) had 6 children, a 195 acre farm, & donated land for the station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Lemuel’s grandparents Archibald Magrew & Ruth (Miller) Magrew moved to Ohio from Pennsylvania & platted Westville in 1815, naming it after the areas first settler, Basil West. Lemuel & Zalinda were buried with relatives in Oak Dale Cemetery on Patrick Ave in Urbana.

Nettleton – Mad River Township
Post Office: 1888 – 1892
Location: 40.119111 -83.874594
on US 36 at the intersection of Zimmerman Rd along Nettle Creek
Remnants: Myrtle Tree Baptist Church & Cemetery on US 36 west of the intersection
Description: Nettleton had a blacksmith shop and a couple of mills next to Nettle Creek owned by the Wiant (Wyant) family. The Myrtle Tree congregation was formed in 1830. Its present church was constructed in 1881. Many members of the Wiant family were buried in the cemetery along with other early pioneers & later residents.

New York
Location: unknown
Description: It was listed in volume 1 of the 1917 county history book on page 1118 as a former town.

Old Pimtown – Salem Township
Location: 40.239989 -83.759892
on Pimtown Rd along Mad River between US 68 & Sidney Rd
Remnants: old business buildings on Pimtown Rd
Description: Old Pimtown was a small farming town with a grist mill next to Mad River. Samuel Taylor owned most of the land in the area. He was married 3 times & had 7 children. The Big Four Railroad went through town but it didn’t have a train station there. Railroad tracks still run through that part of Champaign County & have since been rerouted to the west side of Mad River. The river was dredged in 1910 – 1912 to reduce flooding & caused the farmland values along it to skyrocket. As a consequence, farm wells went dry & had to be dug deeper. Mad River had to be re-dredged after the Great Flood Of 1913. The process was completed in 1916. 

Proctor – Jackson Township
Location: 40.051539 -83.971710
on St Paris – New Carlisle Rd between SR 55 & Cowpath Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: This farming town is a bit of a mystery & there wasn’t any references to it in the old history books. According to the maps, D.W. Proctor was the proprietor & owned a few sections of land in the area. 

Rohrertown – Mad River & Urbana Township
Location: 40.109560 -83.801277
on River Rd along Mad River between US 36 & Stickley Rd
Remnants: none known
Description: The town was founded by Daniel Rohrer (1810 – 1847) from Pennsylvania & Sarah (Loudenback) Rohrer Snyder (1814 – 1874) born in Champaign County. Daniel walked from his home state to Champaign while seeking land to invest in. He walked back to Pennsylvania to gather some personal belongings & returned again on foot to Champaign in the early 1830s. The walking was all done in an effort to save money. Daniel built a grist mill & distillery next to Mad River. 
While nearly monetarily exhausted, Daniel secured a $2,000 loan to complete the mill. He married Sarah in 1834. They had 4 children with one dying in infancy. The mill & distillery were very lucrative enterprises. The loan was paid back within 15 years & the family amassed a fortune of around $45,000. The town also had a general store & a school on land donated by the Rohrers. It was at the bend in River Rd heading north to Stickley Rd. Sarah remarried after Daniel passed away but they were buried together with relatives in Nettle Creek Cemetery at the intersection of SR 560 & Nettlecreek Rd. 

Saratoga (Saratoga Mills) – Salem Township
Location: 40.156576 -83.767857
on SR 296 at the railroad track crossing along the Simon Kenton Trail north of Kings Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: The original town proprietors were Alexander Vance (1811 – 1889) & Mary (Ward) Vance (1818 – 1906). Alexander was a son of Joseph Vance, the 13th Governor Of Ohio & was born on his parents land known as the Governor Vance Farm. He inherited a grist mill on the farm along Kings Creek just south of the GPS coordinates & later added a saw mill. The family donated land for tracks on the Sandusky, Dayton, & Cincinnati Railroad (bought by the Big Four) & the town had a school on the south side of SR 296 east of the railroad. Alexander & Mary had 12 children & sold the farm in 1859 & moved to Urbana. The mills were destroyed in a fire in 1879. Alexander & Mary were buried with relatives in Oak Dale Cemetery on Patrick Ave in Urbana. 

Scottsburg – Concord Township
Location: 40.156526 -83.861624
on Millertown-Eris Rd at the intersection of Lantz Rd north of Hog Creek
Remnants: none known
Description: Orsamus Scott made a plat recording in Section 20 & a few houses were built on the lots, but the town never grew any & quickly faded away.

Sodom – Rush Township
Location: 40.135046 -83.569242
on US 36 between Bullard – Rutan Rd & SR 559
Remnants: Sodom – Clark Cemetery at the GPS Coordinates, former one-room schoolhouse on the north side of US 36 east of the cemetery
Description: Sodom was a small farming town & had a grange hall. The former school has been restored & is now a private residence. Sodom – Clark Cemetery started out on a farm owned by James Clark (1775 – 1862) & Martha (Davis) Clark (1782) – 1868). Many of the headstones have been lost to time.

Steinberger – Mad River Township
Post Office: 1886 – 1887
Location: 40.069162 -83.807802
on SR 55 along Mad River between Bair Rd & W Hickory Grove Rd
Remnants: old houses & farms in the area
Description: The town was founded by David Steinberger (1800 – 1883) & Elizabeth (Pence) Steinberger (1804 – 1834). They were married in 1821, moved to Ohio from Virginia, & had 7 children. David built a grist mill, saw mill, & a whiskey distillery on their farm next to Mad River. After Elizabeth passed away, he married Lucy (Gaines) Steinberger (1813 – 1900) & had 8 more children. A shoe shop was on the northeast side of the intersection of SR 55 & Bair Rd & a school at the intersection of SR 55 & SR 560 was also used for elections. David, Elizabeth, & Lucy were buried with relatives in Nettle Creek Cemetery on SR 560 at Nettlecreek Rd. The Steinberger surname is of German origin with alternative spellings of Steinbarger & Steenbarger.

Stutzmanns – Salem Township
Location: 40.209912 -83.746777
on W Kanagy Road off of US 68
Remnants: still a populated area
Description: This small hamlet was platted on land owned by the Stuzman family which was related by marriage to the Kanagy family. Their alternative surname spellings are Kanaga & Kenaga. Residents were buried in Oak Grove Cemetery east of town on N Ludlow Rd between E Kanagy Rd & Sibley Rd.  

Winchester
Location: unknown
Description: 
It was listed in volume 1 of the 1917 county history book on page 1118 as a former town.

16

Champaign County Ohio Ghost Towns Research Resources

1858 – Champaign County Map

1874 – Champaingn County Atlas

1894 – Champaign County Map

1872 – History Of Champaign And Logan Counties Ohio

1881 – History Of Champaign County Ohio

1902 – A Centennial And Biographical History Of Champaign County Ohio

1917 – History Of Champaign County Ohio – Vol. 1

1917 – History Of Champaign County Ohio – Vol. 2

1917 – History Of Mechanicsburg Ohio